Wednesday, March 01, 2006

Texas #7 for business tax climate

I'm just going to pass this one along without much comment. Of the top 10 states, our biggest competitors to keep an eye on are Florida and Nevada. It's a good ranking. Let's hope we can hold on to it as school finance and other problems get fixed in the next couple of years.

Executive Summary

Full Report

If you want the Texas highlights, go to the pdf full report and use the Adobe search feature on "Texas". It's a quick way to browse a big document. Go wild, all you tax accountants out there.

6 Comments:

At 7:55 AM, March 02, 2006, Anonymous RedScare said...

You sound awfully confident that school finance will get fixed in the next few years. With the current group in Austin, and what they consider important, I have no such confidence. What I AM confident of, is that after they finish shortchanging Texas students, and therefore Texas residents, they will brag about how devoted to education they are, while Texas remains 'first of the worst' in education.

And businesses consider an uneducated workforce a favorable business climate? Under a third world definition, perhaps.

 
At 8:19 AM, March 02, 2006, Blogger Tory Gattis said...

Studies across states generally show very little or no improvement in scores for higher spending per pupil (and there are states that spend a *lot* more than Texas). Yet, between militant teacher unions and indifferent suburban middle class families and nonvoting inner city minorities (not to mention that their Democrat reps are torn between their interests and the money and power of the teacher's union), there's not enough energy to push through real reform like school choice.

At this point, the only sliver of hope are great inner city charter programs like KIPP and YES.

If you want a real eye-opener, watch/read John Stossel's "Stupid in America":
http://abcnews.go.com/2020/
Stossel/story?id=1500338

 
At 8:40 AM, March 02, 2006, Blogger Adam said...

Why not headline it,
"Texans not earning profits from business shoulder seventh largest load to pay for schools, police, roads"

:)

I wonder how the fact that something like 20% of businesses in Texas (including all professional services corporations) pay not taxes figures in. Sounds like a subsidy to me...

 
At 9:04 AM, March 02, 2006, Blogger Tory Gattis said...

It's always a tradeoff: taxing businesses vs. creating jobs, because those businesses can create jobs elsewhere. Perry has proposed a tax increase on biz for education, but I think they're trying to structure it so it hits businesses that are "stuck" here, like certain service businesses.

 
At 9:14 AM, March 02, 2006, Anonymous RedScare said...

"Studies across states generally show very little or no improvement in scores for higher spending per pupil (and there are states that spend a *lot* more than Texas). Yet, between militant teacher unions and indifferent suburban middle class families and nonvoting inner city minorities (not to mention that their Democrat reps are torn between their interests and the money and power of the teacher's union), there's not enough energy to push through real reform like school choice."

Sounds like a quote lifted straight out of a Perry campaign speech. Oh, those poor rich business people, surrounded by militant unions, indifferent middle class and non-voting minorities. If we could just get rid of them, the world would be such a better place.

 
At 7:55 PM, March 02, 2006, Anonymous Brian S. said...

"Sounds like a quote lifted straight out of a Perry campaign speech. Oh, those poor rich business people, surrounded by militant unions, indifferent middle class and non-voting minorities. If we could just get rid of them, the world would be such a better place."

This is why school choice will win. A battle waged by scientific studies against insults is an unmitigated slaughter.

 

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