Sunday, October 02, 2005

Attracting jobs to match our population growth

It's one of those chicken and egg problems: Do new jobs attract new residents? Or do new residents create and attract new jobs? The answer is a little bit of both. For instance, Austin and DFW have continued to add lots of residents over the last 5 years even after they lost a ton of jobs in the Internet bubble crash. And Houston has been adding population at a much faster rate than new jobs. Obviously, those need to come into balance eventually or you've got a problem. This blurb from last week's Houston Business Journal indicates that Texas is positioning itself well to add jobs to match the incoming population. As you can see, the Sunbelt South dominates.
Survey: Texas ranked as best state for business

Texas and North Carolina have the most favorable business climates in the United States, according to a latest survey of 207 senior-level U.S. corporate executives and the site selection consultants who advise them on matters of expansion and relocation.

Rounding out the top five are South Carolina, Georgia, and Nevada. The survey was conducted by Development Counsellors International, an economic development marketing firm that has worked with more than 375 cities, states, regions and countries throughout the world to attract investors and visitors.

Credited for a favorable tax climate, business-friendly attitude and low cost of business, Texas claimed the Best State for Business title for the third consecutive survey, with 33 percent of the respondents giving the Lone Star State highest marks.

3 Comments:

At 10:40 AM, October 03, 2005, Blogger kjb434 said...

Another great reason to lower taxes on business to help the economy flourish and generate jobs.

This isn't a conservative vs liberal argument, it's an economic argument.

 
At 6:01 PM, October 03, 2005, Blogger Andrew said...

Right along with lowering taxes on businesses to help job growth, Houston has to really focus on improving the quality of life.
That includes improving schools, health care, and our transportation system. Plus, lets not forget to try to improve our air quality which is well known to be one of the worst in the nation.
Quality of life is another reason businesses relocate to any given area.

 
At 4:48 PM, October 04, 2005, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Lowering taxes on business is great, but if you have an uneducated backwater population in a city that lacks infrastructure, technology, and health care, no one will want to go to that city/state.

Its not that you are adding more jobs in Houston that matters, what matters is the quality of jobs added.

So California and Massachussets, even with high taxes and high cost of living, still continually add the highest quality jobs because they have top notch research and educational facilities. Not surprisingly, Austin has attracted the most technology, software, and biotech companies in Texas because of its excellent educational foundation.

 

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